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FrankR

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Genealogy Database Helps to Solve 30-Year-Old Child Murder Cold Case

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Scott

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DNA for Sale: Ancestry wants your spit, your DNA and your trust. Should you give them all 3?

Workers at Spectrum Solutions in Draper, Utah, process DNA spit kits before they are sent to customers of Ancestry.com on April 16, 2018. Spectrum is a contractor to Ancestry, a Utah-based company that has grown to become the world's largest DNA testing company, which more than 10 million customers since 2012. (Stuart Leavenworth/McClatchy/TNS) 1232652

http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/DNA-for-Sale-Ancestry-wants-your-spit-your-DNA-and-your-trust-Should-you-give-them-all-3-_168819151
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Tamster

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Is your DNA in a police database?


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"Stand with anybody that stands RIGHT. Stand with him while he is right and PART with him when he goes wrong." --Abraham Lincoln
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Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable - a most sacred right - a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.

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Americans keep giving up their privacy and will find themselves enslaved by the big monstrous government beast that they are creating.
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ThePlainTruth

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Professor George Church said medical treatments could be used to alter DNA 

Arevolutionary genetic editing technique designed to repair faulty DNA could be used by criminals to evade justice, experts have said.

The Crispr system acts like molecular scissors to snip away damaged genes and replace them with healthy code and it is hoped it will one day fix genetic diseases such as sickle cell anaemia, cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy.

But Professor George Church, of Harvard University, who pioneered the use of the Crispr technique, said it would be possible for criminals to use the technique to disappear from forensic databases or evade detection.

Crispr kits can now be bought online for around £150, and last year former Nasa biochemist Josiah Zayner  injected himself...

 
 https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/05/05/criminals-could-alter-dna-evade-justice-new-genetic-editing/
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BobBarney

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I told my wife NEVER to trust 23 and Me....   The wife of Google founder (who is a spy for our government -Google= Govt oooggling) These people are globalist that are getting rich of of GOVT ELITE GLOBALIST who are prying your civil rights away. They get around the law by having website that YOU feed the info to)   BE AWARE!

big brother.jpg 

Use of DNA in serial killer probe sparks privacy concerns

Investigators who used a genealogical website to find the ex-policeman they believe is a shadowy serial killer and rapist who terrified California decades ago call the technique groundbreaking.

But others say it raises troubling legal and privacy concerns for the millions of people who submit their DNA to such sites to discover their heritage.

There aren't strong privacy laws to keep police from trolling ancestry site databases, said Steve Mercer, the chief attorney for the forensic division of the Maryland Office of the Public Defender.

"People who submit DNA for ancestors testing are unwittingly becoming genetic informants on their innocent family," Mercer said, adding that they "have fewer privacy protections than convicted offenders whose DNA is contained in regulated databanks."

Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, was arrested Tuesday after investigators matched crime-scene DNA with genetic material stored by a distant relative on an online site. From there, they narrowed it down to the Sacramento-area grandfather using DNA obtained from material he'd discarded, Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert said.

Authorities declined to name the online site. However, two of the largest, Ancestry.com and 23andMe, said Thursday that they weren't involved in the case.

https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/dna-serial-killer-probe-sparks-privacy-concerns-54772519




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